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Welcome to the blog home of Rose Eye Media and Dylan Rose. You'll find posts on my latest photographic efforts, current projects, tech, skills I'm working on and items of interest. Comments, questions and feedback is welcome.

Where the Redwoods Meet the Sea

Part of the brilliance of living in Southern Oregon is an unparalleled access to wild and beautiful places. Nature offers a massive dynamic range of sights and experiences within a tank of gas of Ashland. Within a two hour drive you can experience high alpine wilderness, world class whitewater, dense Ponderosa forests, expansive farm lands and the mighty Pacific Ocean.

All of this can make a simple Memorial Day camping trip extremely challenging to decide exactly where one should go. The beauty that surrounds us in all directions can make the decision overwhelming at times. Luckily, some dear friends of ours made the decision for us on this occasion as they had a campsite reserved out on the coast and a game plan was in place. All we had to do was load the truck and go!

Mixed hard light and intense shadows made this a really tough exposure. I loved the extension of the fallen tree extending to the vertical tree in the background. 17mm  f/8  1/250 sec

Mixed hard light and intense shadows made this a really tough exposure. I loved the extension of the fallen tree extending to the vertical tree in the background. 17mm  f/8  1/250 sec

It seems absolutely impossible to capture the pure majesty of these incredible trees with a camera. More than just trees these specimens have a real presence about them. Their beauty is thoroughly awe-inspiring and to capture the vibe of the experience of being in their midst seems like an impossible task as you look through the viewfinder. In my somewhat feeble feeling attempts to capture these behemoths I shot them handheld with my wide-angle and hoped for the best (Canon EF 17 - 40mm).

The Stout Tree with the camera resting on the tree itself. 17mm  f/22  1/5 sec 

The Stout Tree with the camera resting on the tree itself. 17mm  f/22  1/5 sec 

The whole process of taking a photo of these centurions seems impossibly inadequate. You're looking at a living organism that is 340 feet tall, some 16 feet in diameter and potentially a couple of thousand years old. Some ill fated attempts were made to present scale with a human in the foreground but somehow, when humanity was captured in the same frame as the incredible beings it seemed to cheapen the subject of the shot. These trees have endured many hundred year floods, raging forest fires and incredible changes in its environment. Still they stand and still they go on. It's hard not to be consumed by reverence standing next to them.

A massive redwood root wad in black and white. 17mm  f/8  1/15 sec

A massive redwood root wad in black and white. 17mm  f/8  1/15 sec

I'm looking forward to returning the Redwoods for more dedicated photo opportunities. I was really hoping to find angled light through the trees to shoot but our early afternoon timing did not reveal it. A tripod will also be critical to bring along on the next visit. The lack of light shining through to the forest floor can present a real challenge and long shutter releases. ISO speeds were cranked to deal with the lack of available light and I'm looking forward to having a stable base to shoot from for the next trip.

The Northern Californian coast at the border of Oregon offers spectacular beauty and an amazing get-a-way. 17mm  f/22  1/30 sec

The Northern Californian coast at the border of Oregon offers spectacular beauty and an amazing get-a-way. 17mm  f/22  1/30 sec

I welcome your comments and feedback and thanks so for reading!

Dylan